Our Cloud Forests need your help – Volunteer and escape to the lush wildlife haven of Northern QLD

Posted on 1 CommentPosted in Cape York, crawly, East coast, feathered, furry, Nocturnal, North QLD, Places, scaly

This month not for profit organisation Earthwatch are busy chasing volunteers for their expeditions to discover more about the unique and fascinating wildlife of our Cloud Forests here in Queensland…
Escape the sounds of the bustling city as you step into the lush and tranquil tropics on Earthwatch’s Wildlife of the Cloud Forests expedition. The sounds of a bird chorus at dawn and trickling waters of nearby creeks and streams will be your new home, as you immerse yourself in this once-in-a-lifetime adventure.

Biodiversity: A hot topic this month

Posted on 2 CommentsPosted in Backyard, Cape York, Central Australia, Central QLD, crawly, East coast, Eyre Peninsula, feathered, finned, furry, Mallee, Marine, North QLD, NSW coast, scaly, South Australia, South East QLD

The arrival of spring is not the only reason to celebrate in September, it’s also national biodiversity month.
It provides a chance to celebrate Australia’s magnificent flora, fauna and landscapes; and to promote the conservation of our unique native wildlife.
To wrap up NBM 2011, I thought we’d reflect a bit on what “biodiversity” means in Australia.

Size matters for an Australian giant

Posted on 1 CommentPosted in Cape York, Nocturnal, North QLD, scaly

Far north QLD never fails to deliver awesome wildlife encounters at any time of the day or night. While spotlighting recently on Cape York I half tripped over a small log while navigating a particularly dense patch of woodland. I shone my torch to the ground to avoid a face plant and realised my ‘log’ had two eyes and an unimpressed look on his face. I had accidently stumbled over Australia’s largest snake, the Scrub Python (Morelia kinghorni).

Spotted! Spotted Whistling Ducks in Weipa

Posted on 2 CommentsPosted in Cape York, feathered, Spotted!

Now here’s one you don’t get to see too often. Unless of course you live in Weipa. Then you would see these guys fairly regularly on the local sewage ponds (on a side note – sewage ponds are a great place to see birds if you can handle the smell). But for those of us from anywhere else in Australia the sight of a Spotted Whistling Duck (Dendrocygna guttata) is something to write home about.